Don’t Settle for Cookie Cutter Care at Home

Buckhead home careThe best thing about humankind is that each and every one is totally unique, and that does not change merely because of growing older. As we mature, we remain the unique and intricate individuals that we have been our whole lives. Expecting all seniors to act the same and require the very same things is a cookie cutter approach that just does not work for older adults or those who take care of them. Providing care to older individuals necessitates a creative and careful approach that enables the caregiver to evaluate just who an older adult is and what the person’s distinct needs are to decide on the best plan of care to keep the senior healthy and well at home. [Read more…]

In Home Care Is Where the Heart Is

In Home Care“One thing’s for certain – I never want to live in a nursing home.”

If you are the adult child of a senior parent, it’s likely that you’ve heard your loved one exclaim these words or something similar indicating the intention to continue to grow older in place at home instead of moving into a nursing home or assisted living facility. Reality is, the majority of older adults want to stay in their own homes for as long as possible – for a variety of reasons. Home is the place they’ve lovingly created, so it’s where they feel the most comfortable. Continuing to live at home also brings meaning and purpose to one’s life. Activities as simple as looking at one’s possessions, leafing through the mail, or relaxing on the porch are more meaningful in one’s own home than in a facility because it is the dwelling that creates the context of one’s life. The comforts of home supply a sense of peacefulness and privacy that cannot be replaced. [Read more…]

National Bath Safety Month: Elderly Care Makes Bathtime a Safe Time for Seniors

Elderly CareHow could something that’s so comforting and soothing, like a nice, warm bath, become one of the biggest dangers to seniors? The truth is, the combination of slick surfaces, slippery shampoo and very warm water creates the perfect storm for a fall risk – one of the most severe risks to seniors.

January is designated as National Bath Safety Month, and it’s a great time for both training and assessment to ensure your senior loved ones’ bathroom environments are as safe as possible.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that approximately 370 people of all ages suffer tub or shower-related accidents each day in the United States, but elderly care services, like those provided by Regency Home Care in Atlanta, GA, can help reduce bathtime hazards and keep seniors safe and secure. Because most falls in the home take place in the bathroom, AARP advises taking the following preventative measures:

  • Put in grab bars for the toilet, shower, and tub
  • Install non-skid tile or use non-skid bath mats
  • Set the temperature of the home’s hot water heater to 120 degrees F or lower to prevent scalds
  • Provide a transfer bench to get in and out of the bathtub if prone to falling when stepping over the tub wall
  • Provide a bath chair to enable bathers to sit while bathing
  • Apply no-slip strips to the tub and shower floor, or provide a slip-resistant mat
  • Wipe up any water spills on the floor immediately

It’s also a good idea to assess whether it could be worthwhile for a senior to make use of a mobile commode, which may be placed at a bedside to relieve nighttime bathroom requirements. Bedside commodes can reduce the risk of evening falls, and may also be placed directly over the toilet, which is generally sturdier than a raised toilet seat. Features to look for when purchasing a commode:

  • Non-removable armrests
  • Rubber tips on the legs as opposed to wheels
  • A frame that is sturdy
  • Both a pail (with lid) and a sleeve (for use over the toilet)

Standard, basic commodes can cost anywhere between $60 and $250, although more complex, specialized commodes, such as those that have tilting mechanisms, can run as high as $3,000.

AARP also provides a helpful bathroom checklist with design directions that can help seniors and their families make the most appropriate home modification decisions.

Regency Home Care of Georgia can additionally help with bathroom safety for seniors. We can provide an in-home safety assessment and suggestions, and by offering expert, hands-on elderly care assistance at bathtime, can help ensure that seniors remain safe throughout all of their bathroom needs – always delivered with the utmost respect and regard for dignity and privacy. Contact us at (678) 999-2446 for more information about our wide array of Atlanta in-home care services.

Ten Signs of Alzheimer’s

1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life

One of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s is memory loss, especially forgetting recently learned information. Others include forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; relying on memory aids (e.g. reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things they used to handle on their own.

What’s a typical age-related change? Sometimes forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later. [Read more…]

Changes Related to Aging

Contrary to popular belief, most American seniors live independently while maintaining strong relationships with family and friends. Their personalities remain relatively stable throughout their lives. Depression occurs less in un-institutionalized seniors than among young adults.

Normal age related changes do occur. These may include:
  • Hearing impairment
  • Failing vision
  • Osteoporosis
  • Increased likelihood of arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension [Read more…]

Six Subtle Signs Indicating More Care at Home May Be Needed

As eyesight diminishes, mobility falters or memory fades, it’s not easy to admit you may need help, and when it comes to personal care needs, it can become even more difficult. Couple this with a fear of losing your independence and it isn’t hard to imagine why many seniors keep their needs to themselves. This is why watching for signs that could indicate extra assistance is needed oftentimes falls on family, friends, or advisers. [Read more…]

Recognizing the Differences Between Depression and Dementia in the Elderly

The elderly are at risk for depression and in America, some 6 million seniors will be diagnosed. Risk factors include lack of social support, living alone, and illness- long term or terminal. Commonly those suffering from Alzheimer’s related dementia are more likely to develop depression, as well as those suffering from Parkinson’s, heart disease, cancer or stroke.

At Home health care Georgia provider,Regency Home Care, a large percentage of our client base are individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia. We are constantly working to provide the highest possible level of care for our clients. One way we do this is by providing useful tips and information to our clients, caregivers and family members. [Read more…]